Online CPR - AEDCPR

Online CPR Test Questions

QUESTION 11

A rescuer is providing CPR to a 10-year old boy. The victim's abdomen has become swollen and is expanding during ventilations. What is the most likely cause of this?

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The answer to Question 11 can be found in the following online certification course:

Online CPR Course

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Rescue Breathing

If the victim has a pulse but is not breathing, provide rescue breathing at a rate of 1 breath every 3-5 seconds. The breaths should be sufficient to make the chest rise and be delivered over 1 ½ - 2 seconds. Deliver rescue breaths for about 1 minute, then re-assess the victim starting this time with a pulse check.



IMPORTANT:
Be careful not to breathe with too much force or volume. This will cause abdominal distension. The victim’s abdomen will swell and make it difficult to ventilate.

Rescue Breathing

If the victim has a pulse but is not breathing, provide rescue breathing at a rate of 1 breath every 3-5 seconds. The breaths should be sufficient to make the chest rise and be delivered over 1 ½ - 2 seconds. Deliver rescue breaths for about 1 minute, then re-assess the victim starting this time with a pulse check.



IMPORTANT:
Be careful not to breathe with too much force or volume. This will cause abdominal distension. The victim’s abdomen will swell and make it difficult to ventilate.

Online CPR
Minor distention should not diminish the effectiveness of CPR. However, if the abdomen becomes extremely distended during CPR, excessive pressure will be against the diaphragm and ventilations will not supply oxygen to the lungs. The victim may vomit during CPR which will relieve the pressure. If not, you will need to clear the air that has become trapped in the victim. The best way is to straddle the victim, turn the victim's head to the side and push upward (toward the victim's head) on the abdomen. This will expel the trapped air as well as the contents of the victim's stomach. Check the airway for possible obstructions and continue CPR until EMS arrives. Be sure to tell them everything that has happened.
AEDCPR
2017-06-26 13:36:27
Online CPR
What if this happens?
What do I do if the abdomen becomes swollen during CPR?
Deanna
2017-06-23 09:26:21
1 Answer

Minor distention should not diminish the effectiveness of CPR. However, if the abdomen becomes extremely distended during CPR, excessive pressure will be against the diaphragm and ventilations will not supply oxygen to the lungs. The victim may vomit during CPR which will relieve the pressure. If not, you will need to clear the air that has become trapped in the victim. The best way is to straddle the victim, turn the victim's head to the side and push upward (toward the victim's head) on the abdomen. This will expel the trapped air as well as the contents of the victim's stomach. Check the airway for possible obstructions and continue CPR until EMS arrives. Be sure to tell them everything that has happened.
AEDCPR
2017-06-26 13:36:27